Latest Research

Nightingale - John Spaull

Counting songs: estimating the UK’s Nightingale population

A new study led by BTO estimates the UK Nightingale population at 5095 – 5983 territorial males. The study also highlights the importance of Lodge Hill SSSI as important sites and discusses the use of appropriate methodology when estimating populations for scarcer species.
Grey Partridge, by Jill Pakenham

Valuing biodiversity - the importance of looking at multiple species and values

The valuing of biodiversity for human benefit has become an important principle for those involved in making decisions about the management of natural resources. There is, however, a need to understand just what ‘valuing’ biodiversity really means, and to determine which species within a community contribute to which values and to what degree. Few studies have attempted to score species objectively across the different ways of valuing nature and biodiversity, so this paper provides some valuable insight.

Blue Tit, by Paul Newton

Does garden feeding shape populations?

Feeding wild birds is a popular pastime and many of us provide seed and other foods to help our feathered friends. But what impact does all this food have? 
Training a BBS volunteer, by David Tipling

Opening up biodiversity data - challenges and opportunities

Public data archiving (PDA), where data are made freely available on demand through recognised data repositories, is increasingly being required by funders and journals to promote ‘open data’. However, this rapidly developing area brings with it some potential risks, particularly to the maintenance and operation of long-term citizen science monitoring schemes. What are the solutions? 
Whinchat, by Edmund Fellowes

Crossing barriers: does flexibility provide resilience in a changing world?

Migratory barriers, such as the Sahara Desert, are thought to present a challenge to small migrant birds like Whinchat, but how much do we really know about the strategies these birds use when crossing barriers and can these strategies provide resilience to future changes in barrier width that might arise from changes in climate and land-use?

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