State of Nature 2016 - a summary

State of Nature 2016

The State of Nature report brings together data and expertise from over 50 organisations, providing an update on how wildlife is faring across the UK, and its seas, Crown Dependencies and Overseas Territories.

Over 7,500,000 volunteer hours go into monitoring the UK's nature every year.

From the Isles of Scilly to Unst, St Kilda to Lowestoft, volunteers have covered the four corners of the UK.

Much of this data was used in the State of Nature Report

Volunteers monitored over 9,670 species from birds to butterflies, plants to pondlife, spiders to snails.

Further afield, monitoring covers the UK's overseas territories too, from the chilly British Antarctic Territory to the tropical British Indian Ocean Territory.

Nature is in trouble

Using modern Red List criteria, which identify species of the highest conservation concern, we assessed 8,000 species. Of these, 15% are extinct or threatened with extinction from Great Britain.

One way of assessing how damaged nature is across the world is the Biodiversity Intactness Index

Best

Worst

Greenland

Norway

Germany

Greece

France

Ireland

USA

Hong Kong

Macao

Of 218 countries assessed, the UK is ranked 189

This means that nature is faring worse in the UK than in most other countries.

What happened in the UK?

56% of UK species in decline.

Some of the hardest hit are well-known and popular, such as hedgehogs and turtle doves...

165 species are considered Critically Endangered in Great Britain - these are the most likely to go extinct.

They include...

high brown fritillary butterfly

freshwater pearl mussel

mole cricket

bog hoverfly

It's not all doom and gloom. Some species are actually doing well.

Otters are catching fish again in our cleaner rivers

red kites soar over much of the countryside

and bitterns boom in our reedbeds

Butterflies like silver-spotted skippers and large blues are faring well

as are plants like the fantastically named fig-leaved goosefoot

What happened in England?

Many species in England are in decline.

Some of the hardest hit are well-known and popular, such as hedgehogs and turtle doves...

109 English species are considered Critically Endangered in Great Britain - these are the most likely to go extinct.

They include...

lundy cabbage flea beetle

small fleabane

shepherd's-needle

It's not all doom and gloom. Some species are actually doing well.

Little egrets are thriving in our wetlands

red kites soar over much of the countryside

and bitterns boom in our reedbeds

Butterflies like silver-spotted skippers and large blues are faring well

as are plants like the fantastically named lady's slipper orchid

What happened in Northern Ireland?

Many species in Northern Ireland are in decline.

Some of the hardest hit are well-known and popular, such as skylarks and red squirrels...

45 Northern Irish species are considered Critically Endangered in an all-Ireland context - these are the most likely to go extinct.

They include...

freshwater pearl mussel

furry-claspered furrow-bee

It's not all doom and gloom. Some species are actually doing well.

Blackcaps are warbling in our woodlands

buzzards are soaring over much of our countryside

Butterflies like green-veined whites and ringlets are faring well

as are plants like the fantastically named frog orchid

What happened in Scotland?

Many species in Scotland are in decline.

Some of the hardest hit are well-known and popular, such as capercaillie and wildcat...

65 Scottish species are considered Critically Endangered in Great Britain - these are the most likely to go extinct.

They include...

pine hoverfly

corn buttercup

It's not all doom and gloom. Some species are actually doing well.

Otters are catching fish again in our cleaner rivers

red kites soar over much of the countryside

Butterflies like ringlets and commas are faring well

as are plants like twinflower

What happened in Wales?

Many species in Wales are in decline.

Some of the hardest hit are well-known and popular, such as hedgehogs and starlings...

41 Welsh species are considered Critically Endangered in Great Britain - these are the most likely to go extinct.

They include...

high brown fritillary butterfly

scarce awl robberfly

wild cotoneaster

It's not all doom and gloom. Some species are actually doing well.

Little egrets are thriving in our wetlands

red kites soar over much of the countryside

Butterflies like ringlets and dingy footman are faring well

as are plants like the fantastically named three-lobed water-crowfoot.

Why is this happening?

A range of factors affect the state of nature in the UK, two of the most important are agriculture and climate change

Agriculture

Around 75% of the UK is managed for food production. How we manage this land is key to the State of Nature.

A recent study showed that 20% of all impact on species populations was down to 'intensive management of agricultural land'

However, working with farmers and wildlife-friendly farming schemes can help reverse this.

Hope Farm in Cambridgeshire, farmed using nature-friendly methods, has bucked national trends since 2000.

Hope Farm

Butterfly Index increased 224%

Farmland Bird Index increased 174%

National trend

Butterfly Index for England declined 2%

Farmland Bird Index for England declined 10%

These indexes monitor several key bird and butterfly species over time to see the overall trend.

Climate change

In the UK climate change is extending suitable conditions for species previously restricted to the south enabling them to move north, if suitable habitat exists.

In contrast to these climate change winners, are the species that favour conditions further north and at high altitudes. These species may have nowhere to go.

Climate change winners

Dartford warbler

Comma butterfly

Climate change losers

Dotterel

Dormouse

What are we doing to help?

The State of nature partnership manages over 4,000 reserves, covering at least 2,700 square miles or 6,800 square km

That's an area over four times the size of Greater London.

From reintroducing pine martens to Wales and turning cities wild across England, to saving magnificent meadows in Northern Ireland and restoring coastal habitats in Scotland, the State of Nature Partnership is actively working to bring nature back.

How you can help

The good news is that there's lots you can do to help. Here's how...

Count the wildlife that's counting on you.

Producing the State of Nature report was only possible due to thousands of volunteers giving up their time to help record and monitor wildlife. There are a number of schemes which need more help.

These are some of the organisations offering great opportunities to count wildlife:

People's Trust for Endangered Species Earthwatch Institute Marine Conservation Society British Trust for Ornithology The National Biodiversity Network Botanical Society of Britain & Ireland Bat Conservation Trust PlantLife ARC iSpot

Volunteer

State of Nature partners welcome volunteers to help with a wide range tasks from managing nature reserves to answering the phone. Whatever your skills you could help nature by volunteering your time and support.

These are some of the organisations offering great opportunities for volunteers:

The Wildlife Trusts The RSPB ARC Bat Conservation Trust National Trust PlantLife Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust Bumblebee Conservation Trust

Manage your space for wildlife

From bats to butterflies, nature needs your help. Manage your space for wildlife, whether it's in your garden, house, window box, school or office you can help nature thrive.

These are some of the organisations with great ideas for your green space:

People's Trust for Endangered Species The RSPB Butterfly Conservation Buglife The Wildlife Trusts Bumblebee Conservation Trust Friends of the Earth

Make your voice for nature heard.

From protecting important sites for wildlife to defending the laws that protect nature you can make your views count.

These are some of the organisations offering great campaigning opportunities:

The Wildlife Trusts The RSPB Friends of the Earth Woodland Trust Marine Conservation Society

Live sustainably

The food we eat, the energy we use and how we travel can all have knock on impacts on nature. But there is information available that can help you live more sustainably.

These are some of the organisations offering great tips on living sustainably:

The Wildlife Trusts Marine Conservation Society ZSL WWF

The State of Nature UK and country reports were produced by a partnership of over 50 organisations involved in the recording, researching and conservation of nature in the UK and its Overseas Territories.

A Focus On Nature, A Rocha, Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, Association of Local Environmental Records Centres, Ballinderry Rivers Trust, Bat Conservation Ireland, Bat Conservation Trust, Biodiversity Ireland, Biological Records Centre, Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland, British Bryological Society, British Dragonfly Society, British Lichen Society, British Pteridological Society, British Trust for Ornithology, Buglife, Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Butterfly Conservation, Causeway Coast & Glens Borough Council, Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Centre for Environmental Data and Recording, Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management, Conchological Society of Great Britain and Ireland, Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Earthwatch, Freshwater Habitats Trust, Friends of the Earth, Froglife, Fungus Conservation Trust, iSpot, Jersey Government Department of the Environment, John Muir Trust, Mammal Society, Local Records Centres Wales, Manx BirdLife, Marine Biological Association, MARINELife, Marine Conservation Society, Marine Ecosystems Research Programme, National Biodiversity Data Centre, National Biodiversity Network, National Forum for Biological Recording, National Trust, National Trust for Scotland, Natural History Museum, Northern Ireland Bat Group, Northern Ireland Marine Task Force, ORCA, People's Trust for Endangered Species, Plantlife, PREDICTS, Rothamsted Research, The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, Scottish Badgers, Scottish Wildlife Trust, Shark Trust, States of Guernsey, Sir Alister Hardy Foundation for Ocean Science, Ulster Wildlife, University of Sheffield, Vincent Wildlife Trust, Whale and Dolphin Conservation, Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, Wildlife Trusts, Woodland Trust, WWF, Zoological Society of London.

Photo credits

Infographic by BoldLight

High Brown Fritillary underwing © Iain H Leach, Butterfly Conservation. Freshwater pearl mussel © R Thompson. Mole cricket © John Mason. Bog Hoverfly © Bastiaan Wakkie. Lundy Cabbage Flea Beetle © Roger Key. Scarce Awl Robberfly © Steven Falk, Buglife. Pine hoverfly © Steven Falk, Buglife. Small fleabane © Fred Rumsey, NHM. Shepherd's needle © Fred Rumsey, NHM. Furry-claspered furrow-bee © Steven Falk, Buglife. Wild cotoneaster © Fred Rumsey, NHM. Corn buttercup © Fred Rumsey, NHM. Comma butterfly © Eric Woods (rspb-images.com). Dartford warbler © Andrew Mason (rspb-images.com). Common dormouse © Mark Sisson (rspb-images.com). Dotterel © David J Slater (rspb-images.com).

State of Nature 2016

Mae adroddiad Sefyllfa Byd Natur yn dod â data ac arbenigedd gan dros 50 o gyrff amrywiol ynghyd, ac yn darparu'r newyddion diweddaraf ynglŷn â thynged bywyd gwyllt ledled y DU a'i moroedd, Dibynwledydd y Goron a'i Thiriogaethau Dramor.

Treulir dros 7,500,000 o oriau gwirfoddol yn monitro byd natur y DU bob blwyddyn.

O Ynysoedd Sili i Unst, o ynys Sant Kilda i Lowestoft, mae gwirfoddolwyr wedi gweithredu ar hyd a lled y DU

Defnyddiwyd llawer o'r data yma yn Adroddiad Sefyllfa Byd Natur

Bu gwirfoddolwyr yn monitro dros 9,670 o rywogaethau o adar i loÿnnod byw, o blanhigion i fywyd y pwll, ac o bryfed cop i falwod.

Dramor, mae monitro hefyd yn digwydd yn nhiriogaethau tramor y DU, o diroedd rhewllyd Tiriogaeth Prydain yn yr Antarctig i Diriogaeth Prydain Cefnfor yr India.

Mae byd natur mewn trybini

Wrth ddefnyddio meini prawf cyfoes y Rhestr Goch, sy'n nodi rhywogaethau o'r pryder cadwraethol mwyaf, aseswyd 8,000 rhywogaeth. Allan o'r rhain, mae 15% wedi diflannu'n gyfan gwbl neu mewn perygl o ddifodiant o Brydain Fawr.

Un dull o asesu faint o niwed a wnaed i fyd natur ledled y byd yw'r Mynegai Cyfanrwydd Bioamrywiaeth

Gorau

Gwaethaf

Yr Ynys Las

Norwy

Yr Almaen

Groeg

Ffrainc

Iwerddon

UDA

Hong Kong

Macao

O 218 gwlad a aseswyd, gosodir y DU yn rhif 189 ar y rhestr

Mae hyn yn golygu bod byd natur yn dioddef mwy yn y DU nag yn y rhan fwyaf o wledydd eraill.

What happened in the UK?

56% of UK species in decline.

Some of the hardest hit are well-known and popular, such as hedgehogs and turtle doves...

165 species are considered Critically Endangered in Great Britain - these are the most likely to go extinct.

They include...

high brown fritillary butterfly

freshwater pearl mussel

mole cricket

bog hoverfly

It's not all doom and gloom. Some species are actually doing well.

Otters are catching fish again in our cleaner rivers

red kites soar over much of the countryside

and bitterns boom in our reedbeds

Butterflies like silver-spotted skippers and large blues are faring well

as are plants like the fantastically named fig-leaved goosefoot

What happened in England?

Many species in England are in decline.

Some of the hardest hit are well-known and popular, such as hedgehogs and turtle doves...

109 English species are considered Critically Endangered in Great Britain - these are the most likely to go extinct.

They include...

lundy cabbage flea beetle

small fleabane

shepherd's-needle

It's not all doom and gloom. Some species are actually doing well.

Little egrets are thriving in our wetlands

red kites soar over much of the countryside

and bitterns boom in our reedbeds

Butterflies like silver-spotted skippers and large blues are faring well

as are plants like the fantastically named lady's slipper orchid

What happened in Northern Ireland?

Many species in Northern Ireland are in decline.

Some of the hardest hit are well-known and popular, such as skylarks and red squirrels...

45 Northern Irish species are considered Critically Endangered in an all-Ireland context - these are the most likely to go extinct.

They include...

freshwater pearl mussel

furry-claspered furrow-bee

It's not all doom and gloom. Some species are actually doing well.

Blackcaps are warbling in our woodlands

buzzards are soaring over much of our countryside

Butterflies like green-veined whites and ringlets are faring well

as are plants like the fantastically named sticky mouse-ear

What happened in Scotland?

Many species in Scotland are in decline.

Some of the hardest hit are well-known and popular, such as capercaillie and wildcat...

65 Scottish species are considered Critically Endangeredin Great Britain - these are the most likely to go extinct.

They include...

pine hoverfly

corn buttercup

It's not all doom and gloom. Some species are actually doing well.

Otters are catching fish again in our cleaner rivers

red kites soar over much of the countryside

Butterflies like ringlets and commas are faring well

as are plants like the twinflower

Beth ddigwyddodd yng Nghymru?

Mae llawer o rywogaethau yng Nghymru'n prinhau.

Mae rhai o'r rhywogaethau sy'n dioddef fwyaf yn adnabyddus ac yn boblogaidd, fel y draenog a'r ddrudwen...

Ystyrir bod 41 o rywogaethau Cymru mewn Perygl Mawr ym Mhrydain Fawr - dyma'r rhai sydd fwyaf tebygol o fynd i ddifodiant.

Mae'r rhain yn cynnwys...

y glöyn byw'r fritheg frown

pryf lleidr pigfain prin

craigafal y Gogarth

Ond nid yw'r newyddion i gyd yn ddrwg. Mae ambell i rywogaeth yn gwneud yn dda.

Mae'r crëyr bach yn ffynnu yn ein gwlyptiroedd

Mae'r barcud yn hedfan uwchben llawer o'n cefn gwlad

Mae gloÿnnod byw fel gweirlöyn y glaw a gwyfynod fel y troedwas llwydaidd yn ffynnu

yn ogystal â phlanhigion fel crafanc-y-frân dridarn.

Pam fod hyn yn digwydd?

Mae ystod o ffactorau'n effeithio ar sefyllfa byd natur yn y DU, a dau o'r pwysicaf yw amaethyddiaeth a newid hinsawdd

Amaethyddiaeth

Mae oddeutu 75% o'r DU yn cael ei rheoli ar gyfer cynhyrchu bwyd. Mae ein dull o reoli'r tir hwn yn allweddol i Sefyllfa Byd Natur.

Mewn astudiaeth ddiweddar dangoswyd bod 20% o'r holl effeithiau ar boblogaethau rhywogaethau yn digwydd o ganlyniad i 'reolaeth ddwys o dir amaethyddol'

Fodd bynnag, fe all cydweithio gyda ffermwyr a chynlluniau ffermio sy'n gyfeillgar i fywyd helpu i wrthdroi hyn.

Mae'r tueddiadau ar fferm Hope yn Sir Caergrawnt, sy'n cael ei ffermio wrth ddilyn dulliau sy'n gyfeillgar i fyd natur, wedi bod yn groes i dueddiadau cenedlaethol ers 2000.

Fferm Hope

Cynyddodd y Mynegai Gloÿnnod Byw o 224%

Cynyddodd y Mynegai Adar Ffermdir o 174%

Tueddiad cenedlaethol

Mynegai Glöyn Byw Lloegr wedi dirywio 2%

Prinhaodd y Mynegai Adar Ffermdir dros Loegr o 10%

Mae'r mynegeion hyn yn monitro sawl rhywogaeth allweddol o adar a gloÿnnod byw dros gyfnod o amser i weld y tueddiad drwyddo draw.

Newid hinsawdd

Yn y DU mae newid hinsawdd yn ymestyn amodau priodol i rywogaethau a oedd cyn hynny wedi eu cyfyngu i'r de ac yn eu galluogi i symud tua'r gogledd, os oes cynefin addas yn bodoli.

Mewn gwrthgyferbyniad i'r rhai sy'n ennill o ganlyniad i newid hinsawdd mae'r rhywogaethau hynny sy'n ffafrio amodau ymhellach i'r gogledd a thir uchel. Efallai na fydd gan y rhywogaethau yma unrhyw le i fynd iddo.

Enillwyr wrth i'r hinsawdd newid

Telor Dartford

Y glöyn byw'r fantell garpiog

Y rhai sy'n colli gyda newid hinsawdd

Hutan y mynydd

Pathew

Beth ydym ni'n ei wneud i helpu?

Mae partneriaeth Sefyllfa Byd Natur yn rheoli dros 4,000 o warchodfeydd sydd ag arwynebedd o oddeutu 2,700 milltir sgwâr neu 6,800 km sgwâr

Mae'r arwynebedd hwn dros bedair gwaith maint Canol Llundain.

O ailgyflwyno'r bele i Gymru a throi dinasoedd yn wyllt ledled Lloegr, i achub dolydd hyfryd yng Ngogledd Iwerddon ac adfer cynefinoedd arfordirol yn yr Alban, mae Partneriaeth Sefyllfa Byd Natur yn gweithio'n ymarferol i adfer byd natur.

Sut allwch chi helpu

Y newyddion da ydy bod llawer allwch chi ei wneud i helpu. Dyma sut...

Cyfrif y bywyd gwyllt sy'n dibynnu arnoch chi.

Dim ond oherwydd bod miloedd o wirfoddolwyr wedi rhoi o'u hamser i helpu i gofnodi a monitro bywyd gwyllt y bu'n bosibl cynhyrchu adroddiad Sefyllfa Byd Natur. Mae angen mwy o gymorth ar nifer o gynlluniau.

Dyma rai o fudiadau sy'n cynnig cyfleoedd gwych i gyfrif bywyd gwyllt:

People's Trust for Endangered Species Earthwatch Institute Marine Conservation Society British Trust for Ornithology The National Biodiversity Network Botanical Society of Britain & Ireland Bat Conservation Trust PlantLife ARC iSpot

Gwirfoddoli

Mae partneriaid Sefyllfa Byd Natur yn croesawu gwirfoddolwyr i helpu gydag ystod eang o orchwylion o reoli gwarchodfeydd natur i ateb y ffôn. Beth bynnag fo eich medrau gallwch helpu byd natur drwy wirfoddoli eich amser a'ch cefnogaeth.

Dyma rai o fudiadau sy'n cynnig cyfleoedd gwych i wirfoddolwyr.

The Wildlife Trusts The RSPB ARC Bat Conservation Trust National Trust PlantLife Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust Bumblebee Conservation Trust

Rheoli eich gofod dros fywyd gwyllt

O ystlumod i loÿnnod byw, mae angen eich cymorth chi ar fyd natur. Wrth reoli eich gofod dros fywyd gwyllt, un ai mewn gardd, tŷ, blwch ffenestr, ysgol neu swyddfa, gallwch helpu byd natur i ffynnu.

Dyma rai o fudiadau sydd â syniadau da ar gyfer eich gofod gwyrdd.

People's Trust for Endangered Species The RSPB Butterfly Conservation Buglife The Wildlife Trusts Bumblebee Conservation Trust Friends of the Earth

Cofiwch sicrhau bod eich llais yn cael ei glywed

O warchod safleoedd pwysig i fywyd gwyllt i amddiffyn y deddfau sy'n gwarchod byd natur gallwch sicrhau bod eich barn yn cyfrif.

Dyma rai o fudiadau sy'n cynnig cyfleoedd ymgyrchu gwych.

The Wildlife Trusts The RSPB Friends of the Earth Woodland Trust Marine Conservation Society

Byw'n gynaliadwy

Mae'r bwyd yr ydym yn ei fwyta, yr ynni yr ydym yn ei ddefnyddio a sut yr ydym yn teithio i gyd yn cael effaith ar fyd natur. Ond mae gwybodaeth ar gael a all eich helpu i fyw'n fwy cynaliadwy.

Dyma rai o fudiadau sy'n cynnig awgrymiadau gwych ar gyfer byw'n gynaliadwy.

The Wildlife Trusts Marine Conservation Society ZSL WWF

Mae Sefyllfa Byd Natur y DU ac adroddiadau'r gwledydd wedi'u eu cynhyrchu gan bartneriaeth o dros 50 o sefydliadau a gymerodd ran yn y recordio, ymchwilio a chadwraeth natur yn y DU a'i Thiriogaethau Tramor.

A Focus On Nature, A Rocha, Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, Association of Local Environmental Records Centres, Ballinderry Rivers Trust, Bat Conservation Ireland, Bat Conservation Trust, Biodiversity Ireland, Biological Records Centre, Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland, British Bryological Society, British Dragonfly Society, British Lichen Society, British Pteridological Society, British Trust for Ornithology, Buglife, Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Butterfly Conservation, Causeway Coast & Glens Borough Council, Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Centre for Environmental Data and Recording, Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management, Conchological Society of Great Britain and Ireland, Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Earthwatch, Freshwater Habitats Trust, Friends of the Earth, Froglife, Fungus Conservation Trust, iSpot, Jersey Government Department of the Environment, John Muir Trust, Mammal Society, Local Records Centres Wales, Manx BirdLife, Marine Biological Association, MARINELife, Marine Conservation Society, Marine Ecosystems Research Programme, National Biodiversity Network, National Forum for Biological Recording, National Trust, Natural History Museum, Northern Ireland Bat Group, Northern Ireland Marine Task Force, ORCA, People's Trust for Endangered Species, Plantlife, PREDICTS, Rothamsted Research, The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, Scottish Badgers, Shark Trust, States of Guernsey, Sir Alister Hardy Foundation for Ocean Science, University of Sheffield, Vincent Wildlife Trust, Whale and Dolphin Conservation, Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, Wildlife Trusts, Woodland Trust, WWF, Zoological Society of London.

Credit Lluniau

Infographic gan BoldLight

High Brown Fritillary underwing © Iain H Leach, Butterfly Conservation. Freshwater pearl mussel © R Thompson. Mole cricket © John Mason. Bog Hoverfly © Bastiaan Wakkie. Lundy Cabbage Flea Beetle © Roger Key. Scarce Awl Robberfly © Steven Falk, Buglife. Pine hoverfly © Steven Falk, Buglife. Small fleabane © Fred Rumsey, NHM. Shepherd's needle © Fred Rumsey, NHM. Furry-claspered furrow-bee © Steven Falk, Buglife. Wild cotoneaster © Fred Rumsey, NHM. Corn buttercup © Fred Rumsey, NHM. Comma butterfly © Eric Woods (rspb-images.com). Dartford warbler © Andrew Mason (rspb-images.com). Common dormouse © Mark Sisson (rspb-images.com). Dotterel © David J Slater (rspb-images.com).