Latest Research

Starlings by Allan Drewitt

Shaping positive engagements with urban birds

There is growing evidence that interactions with birds in our towns and cities can provide people with feelings of being connected with nature; such interactions can also have positive effects of human well-being. Within the field of ecosystem services such forms of benefit are known as ‘cultural services’. However, not all interactions between people and birds are necessarily positive. Birds are sometimes responsible for disease transmission, for the contamination of water sources, for aggression, damage to property and for causing unwelcome noise and smells. These interactions are known as ‘disservices’.
Greenfinches, by Jill Pakenham

The health hazards to wild birds associated with garden feeding.

The provision of supplementary food for wild birds at garden feeding stations is a widespread practice in the UK. These additional resources have been shown, through research, to be of benefit to wild birds, but there is still a great deal that we do not know about the wider implications of such provisioning. Wherever individual birds congregate, the risk of disease transmission is increased, and the high densities of birds often seen at garden feeding stations might contribute to the emergence and spread of infectious diseases.
What's Under Your Feet

What's Under Your Feet?

A new study, supported by EDF Energy and BTO, has looked into soil invertebrate communities in the UK using large-scale citizen science data from schools. 
Ring-necked Parakeet

Does climate change bring us invasive species?

Non-native species are becoming a more common sight, but is this linked to the changing climate? A new BTO study investigates whether it's possible to predict which non-native species are likely to establish in the UK.

Peregrine by Nathan Guttridge

Breeding Peregrines on the up thanks to growth of lowland populations

The return of breeding Peregrines to former haunts, and the colonisation of urban sites such as industrial buildings and cathedrals, has not gone unnoticed by birdwatchers. It is only now, however, with the publication of the results from the latest national Peregrine survey, that we can put figures on the changing fortunes of this stunning bird of prey.

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