Latest Research

Whinchat, photograph by Edmund Fellowes

Identifying why Whinchats are declining

Populations of Afro-Palearctic migrant birds, which breed in Europe but winter in Africa, have shown severe declines in recent decades. To identify the causes of these declines, accurate measures of demographic rates (e.g. the number of fledglings per season, estimated survival from year to year, and immigration from other populations) are needed to allow effected targeting of conservation and research activities. A new study involving the BTO has examined these measures in Whinchats.
Snipe by Niko Pekonen

Climate change impacts on UK biodiversity: declining moths and increasing aphids

Climate change may affect species populations and disrupt ecological communities. Cross-cutting analysis led by BTO has identified that climate change may have contributed to declines in UK moth populations, and increases in the numbers of flying aphids, since the 1970s.

Long-eared Bat, photograph byJez Blackburn

The impact of new housing on bat populations

New research from the BTO has examined the effects of projected housing developments on bats, using data citizen science data collected by volunteers taking part in the Norfolk Bat Survey.
Curlew chicks, photograph by Hugh Insley

Curlews and godwits - the vanishing tribe

New collaborative research led by the BTO investigates reasons for recent losses in curlews and godwits worldwide and identifies conservation measures which could be put in place to halt the declines.
Speckled Bush-cricket, photograph by Tom Houslay

Sounding them out: bush-cricket conservation via bat monitoring

New research led by the BTO shows how existing our pioneering bat monitoring work via the Norfolk Bat Survey could improve our understanding of bush-crickets - a species group that is difficult to monitor, being hard to see and almost impossible to hear.

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