Welcome to the BTO

Looking out for birds? Share your interest in birds with others by being part of the BTO. Volunteer surveyors, members and staff work in partnership to provide unbiased information about birds and their habitats. Join or volunteer today and make birds count!

Grey Heron chicks by Chris and Elspeth Rowe

BTO’s longest running census goes online

The Heronries Census counted its first Grey Heron nest way back in 1928; 400,000 nests later it has gone digital. Counts are made at heronries by the BTO’s volunteers and it is one of the simplest surveys to take part in. Until now, most counts have been mailed to BTO on special cards but, from now on volunteers have the option of inputting data direct online.

Cuckoo 146759

Eight more Cuckoos join the fight

Eight more Cuckoos have been fitted with satellite tags in Northern England, Wales and the Midlands to help find out how birds in different parts of the country migrate to the Congo rainforest. So far, only one has been given a name but the others will be named shortly as part of a Schools competition. Follow all of them, and perhaps choose one to sponsor now.

Gannet tracks

Track a Gannet

A new and experimental project has just been launched, offering an unrivalled insight into the lifecycle of the Northern Gannet. The project entitled ‘Track a Gannet’, or T.A.G. for short, is jointly run by the Alderney Wildlife Trust (AWT), the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) and the University of Liverpool, and has enabled Gannets to be put under surveillance using the 3G mobile network.

What's Under Your Feet? logo

BTO working with EDF Energy to see 'What's Under Your Feet'

BTO is delighted to announce a new collaboration with EDF Energy, the UK’s largest provider of low carbon energy, to inspire a new generation of scientists. Over the next school year we will be inviting over 20,000 schools who are members of EDF Energy's award winning education programme, the Pod, to find out how climate change, specifically drought, is affecting the abundance of birds across the UK.

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